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a blog by Don R. Crawley

Don Crawley, IT Customer Service Speaker

Bringing humanity into the world of technology

CALL: (206) 988-5858

2016/2017 WINNNER of the Max Dixon Award for Eloquence in Public Speaking

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My friends arrived at the theme park with only about two hours before they had to leave to catch a flight. They knew they would have limited customer choices. They explained their situation to the customer service agent and asked what they could do in the park in two hours. The customer service agent instead starting listing all the things they couldn’t do because they didn’t have enough time. The agent was negative–a real downer. When my friends persisted and suggested that it would be better customer service to focus on what they could do, the agent simply went on and on talking about what they couldn’t do. They finally walked away and went to a different kiosk with a different customer service agent. The second agent focused on the rides that were open and what my friends actually could do, given their limited time.

The second agent used empathy to imagine how he or she would feel if in the same position as my friends and made appropriate recommendations based on that knowledge. A basic concept in customer service is to always try to put yourself in your customers position, to imagine how you would feel in the tables were turned.

Customer Choices Should be Positive

Doesn’t it seem ironic that, when my friends had only limited time, the customer service agent wasted their precious time by talking about what they couldn’t do? The customer service agent, instead, should have put him or herself in my friends position, imagined what they might want to do, and given them options for what was available.

When choices are limited, focus on the choices that are available, not what’s not available. Sure, when a customer asks about a product or service which isn’t available, you need to say it’s not available. But then switch to letting them know what they can do or what is available. Otherwise, you’re just wasting everyone’s time.

For More Ideas on How to Improve Communication and Customer Service Skills

IT customer service bookBring my IT customer service training seminar onsite to your location for your group, small or large. I have programs that can fit nearly any budget. Click here for the course description and outline.

Subscribe to My Free IT Customer Service Training

Sign up for my free IT customer service training by email, The 5 Principles of IT Customer Service Success. The course includes the free version of my new IT customer service book The 5 Principles of IT Customer Service Success and eight free customer service lessons by email.

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